Execution

  • Making the Tough Call with Poor-Fit Talent – Winning Actions, Not Costly Traps

    Worried woman_crop “When someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.”        – Maya Angelou

    The realization may come over time, or it can occur as the result of a single critical incident. You have a poor-fit player in a key management or project position.

    Consider the many ways poor-fit talent can make their presence known. For example:

    • Under-performance due to skill deficits
    • Inability or unwillingness to act on performance feedback
    • Counterproductive – or toxic – personality traits
    • Lack of alignment with the organization’s core strategy or culture
    • Increased interpersonal or departmental conflict

  • Your Most Powerful Question

    Question crop_OKDo you want to improve your strategic planning, business development, time utilization, teamwork, communication and execution effectiveness? Granted, this is a rhetorical question.

    I want to highlight the Most Powerful Question you can have in your leadership repertoire.

  • Toxic-certainty_web

    Toxic Certainty – When What You Know Isn’t So

    “It isn’t what we don’t know that gives us trouble, it’s what we know that ain’t so.”
    – Will Rogers

    Certainty is appealing and comforting. It makes us feel confident and powerful, especially in uncertain times. But it also has a dark side that I call “Toxic Certainty.”

    Toxic Certainty occurs when a person (or group) develops an unshakeable conviction in his/her interpretation of the facts and decision-making, and is immune to contradictory information.

    We see the negative effects of Toxic Certainty in political gridlock. We recognize it in religious extremism. But often Toxic Certainty goes unnoticed when it occurs at headquarters or in the boardroom. Unnoticed, that is, until disaster looms as a result of misguided thinking and actions.

  • Is Your Team Too Smart to Win?

    Argument crop_OKWe know that smart people can come together in projects and produce exceptional work. What is less discussed is that smart individuals can — and do — come together as teams only to generate dysfunction and sub-par results.

    Back in the 1970s and 80s, British management researcher Meredith Belbin discovered unexpectedly poor results with teams formed of people who had sharp, analytical minds and high mental ability. He dubbed these teams of smart people “Apollo teams,” as his research coincided with the American lunar expeditions.

    In case after case of team-based assignments, he found that Apollo teams often finished near the bottom, compared to teams that possessed less individual and collective intellectual firepower.